Listen to the researchers ...

“Documentation is not pretty pictures of engaged children. Rather, it CAPTURES the THINKING process: What MOTIVATED [children] to begin, continue, change direction? What were the BREAKTHROUGHS, the PIVOTAL REMARKS, or ACTIONS? How did they SOLVE the PROBLEM? The goal is to ENABLE whoever reads a panel [documentation] to UNDERSTAND what the child ATTEMPTED and how they went about it, to see STIMULUS, PROCESS, and OUTCOME.” (A Lewin-Benham)

Carol Anne Wien on Pedagogical Documentation

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/document.html

Voices from the Classroom ...

"I found that through my learning, I've learned that documentation on all levels can have a big impact on my practice. By using multiple avenues for documentation (photos, videos, notes, smart technology), I am able to collect objective data to help inform my practice. Upon reflection and discussions with my colleagues, I am able to reflect on my intentions, curriculum expectations, address my biases so that I can create raw documentation that support my students' learning. Having or using limited documentation pieces stunts my observations and my practice. It limits my view of what I understand from my students and it limits my perceptions about what I think I can do." (Primary Educator)

Young Mathematicians: Noticing and Naming

In this video, an educator team discusses how they notice and name children’s mathematical behaviours.

To dig deeper ...

Other resources ...

Macdonald, M., Sanchez, A. (2010). Provoking Dialogue: Promote a deeper understanding of teaching and learning through images and documents. Canadian Children. Vol. 35, Issue 2.