Listen to the researchers ...

Students who have developed a productive disposition are confident in their knowledge and ability. They see that mathematics is both reasonable and intelligible and believe that, with appropriate effort and experience, they can learn. It is counterproductive for students to believe that there is some mysterious ‘math gene’ that determines their success in mathematics. Hence, our view of mathematical proficiency goes beyond being able to understand, compute, solve, and reason. It includes a disposition toward mathematics that is personal. Mathematically proficient people believe that mathematics should make sense, that they can figure it out, that they can solve mathematical problems by working hard on them, and that becoming mathematically proficient is worth the effort.” (National Research Council, 2001)

Voices from the Classroom ...

As part of our 'rethink' about creating a positive classroom climate for mathematics learning, we intentionally worked at changing the language we used when talking with the children. In addition, we created many community events that included parent and student engagement. There is no limit or ceiling to the math learning. When we put out the manipulatives the children took charge and demonstrated way more thinking and learning than we anticipated.” (K-3 Educators)

We were focused on developing a growth mindset and wanted to document the students’ changing perspectives. Our students talked about what they liked and didn’t like about math. Their responses (in the photographs below) helped reveal their mindsets and [enabled us] to see our learning environment through their eyes.” (Elementary Educators)